Help Keep your Dog Safe in the Summer Sun

Dogs don’t have the option of shedding their thick winter coats in the summer time. And as your dog naturally pants year round, you may not notice when they’re doing it as a sign of being overheated. During the summer months, the risk for heatstroke increases and it’s important to be aware of the warning signs.

Dog Safety Pet StopSigns of heat stroke include:

  • Body temperatures of 104-110 Fahrenheit
  • Excessive panting
  • Seizures
  • Sticky or dry tongue and gums
  • Dark or bright red tongue and gums

Heatstroke can be deadly in a very short amount of time. If you suspect your dog is suffering from heatstroke, take immediate action. Make sure you move your dog out of direct sunlight and into shade, provide cool water (not ice water) for them to drink, and place wet cloths on their feet and around their head.

Even if your dog appears fine, their internal organs are also affected by an overall temperature elevation. If you suspect your dog is suffering from heatstroke you should follow the steps above to reduce their body temperature and contact your veterinarian immediately.

It’s important to be aware that some breeds of dog are more susceptible to heatstroke. Short-nosed breeds such as bulldogs or pugs, dogs with thick or heavy coats, and dogs with heart or respiratory problems are at a greater risk for heatstroke.

When you take your dog for walks or runs during the summer make sure you bring water for your pet (they get thirsty after exercising just like you!). If possible, try to avoid walking on pavement or tar; your dog’s paw pads may appear tough, but they’re also sensitive and can be burned by the hot ground. If your dog is walking on pavement, make sure there isn’t any redness or pain.

Some helpful tips to keep your dog safe and cool in the summer heat include:

  • Being aware if your dog is in full sun all day; are they outside on a tether with no access to shade?
  • If your dog is kept inside the house during the day, is there air conditioning to help keep them cool? Having access to a basement can be an alternative to provide them with a cool environment during the day.
  • If your dog is left outside for long periods during the day (ie, while at work), do they have access to fresh water, shelter and shade? Consider having a kiddie pool nearby or a sprinkler with an automatic timer to help keep your dog cool and safe during the day.
  • Is your dog’s water dish able to be knocked over and spilled? Consider an elevated or heavier water bowl to help reduce the chance of your dog spilling their water.
  • Never leave your dog in a locked car, even if you think it will only be for a moment. This can turn dangerous for your dog very quickly!

Following these important tips will help keep your pet healthy and safe in the summer sun!

Do you have anymore tips to protect your dog during the summer?

9 thoughts on “Outdoor Versus Indoor Fences”

  1. I like how you talked about how large to make the containment area for your dog fence before deciding which type to get. If you’re covering a very large area, it seems like a wired fence is smarter, but if it’s a smaller personal property, a wireless one makes sense. Thank you for the information about which to use when for the future.

  2. Lately, I have been thinking about getting a puppy. It is good to know that an I should have a way to prevent my dog from wondering. It seems like it would be smart for me to put up a barrier around my home so he can’t get out.

  3. I like your idea to have toys around the backyard to keep dogs busy and distracted so that they won’t get into the garden so much. My dad takes such good care of his garden every summer and he hates it when the dog gets into his garden and messes things up. I wonder if there is a more reliable way to keep dogs within a certain perimeter to prevent them from going where they shouldn’t go.

  4. It was nice to know that I can actually put up a pokey barrier around the garden since dogs don’t really like to be poked. In my case, I think I need something like that surrounding the house. I am not worried about the garden after all. I am worried that my pup will go out to the streets when I am not looking.

  5. It’s been 8th weeks since our labrador gave birth to her 6 cute puppies. Now, they are already playing outside. To ensure that they’ll be safer and secure, I will ask my husband to install a higher fence with a net for them.

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